About Angela Gallagher-Brett

I am a language education specialist and learning developer working at the LLAS Centre for languages, linguistics and area studies at the University of Southampton and at SOAS, University of London.This is my personal website where I share my reflections on languages, higher education, research and reading.

Presenting at the Collaborative Action Research Conference at the University of Crete

I was very pleased to present a paper at the recent Collaborative Action Research Conference on Action Research Communities for Language Teachers (a project funded by the European Centre for Modern Languages) with my colleague, Christine Lechner from the Pädagogische Hochschule Tirol. The conference, Reflecting on Action Research in an unequal world: alternative perspectives on democracy was held at the University of Crete in Rethmyno https://carnreth2017.wixsite.com/carn. The conference was inspiring with so many examples of teacher action research in classrooms across Europe. The wonderful Cretan hospitality and beautiful setting contributed to a wonderful few days.


Innovative language teaching and learning at university: enhancing employability

I recently had the pleasure of co-editing (alongside Carmen Alvarez-Mayo, University of York and Franck Michel, Newcastle University) a new book on enhancing employability in language teaching. This edited collection includes numerous case studies involving university languages practitioners who have integrated employability projects into their teaching. There is some really great advice here for language teachers.

The book is fully open access and available here.

This collection follows on from an earlier employability handbook published in 2016.


Action Research Communities for Language Teachers

I am a partner in Action Research Communities for language teachers, a project funded by the European Centre for Modern Languages.

The project aims to make techniques for action research widely available to language teachers across Europe by establishing a community of practice which brings together newly qualified and experienced teachers with teacher educators and university researchers. The project will strengthen professional language teaching networks by forging links between academic expertise on action research and good practice in language classrooms. Language teachers will be able to benefit from improved access to action research and to a diverse range of perspectives on teaching methodologies. In addition, this project will provide opportunities for language teachers to reflect on practice and to propose and test innovations while working collaboratively within a community of practice.

More information on the project can be found on the ECML website: www.ecml.at/actionresearch

Motivational and learning benefits of peer mentoring

I’m about to start work on a small-scale qualitative study to explore the motivational and learning benefits of (near) peer mentoring for a team of PhD student mentors. In my role as Head of Learning and Teaching Development in a UK university, I oversee a scheme in which PhD students are recruited and trained to act as essay, dissertation writing and language advising one-to-one mentoring tutors to undergraduate and Masters students. The scheme is underpinned by a Vygotskian perspective whereby it is assumed that learners advance their thinking and understanding through interaction with a more competent peer (see for example, Mynard & Almarzouqi, 2006).  Our evaluation processes indicate that the scheme is highly valued by UG and PGT students. However, we know little about any benefits for the PhD students who act as mentors and so I’m hoping to be able to shed a little more light on these.


Mynard, J. & Almarzouqi, I. (2006) Investigating peer tutoring. ELT Journal 60 (1), 13-22.

Employability for Languages: A Handbook

Employability for Languages: A Handbook which I co-edited with two of my University of Southampton colleagues, Erika Corradini and Kate Borthwick was published in the summer by Research-Publishing.net.

The book showcases a collection of case studies and projects which teachers have embedded into the languages curriculum to enable students in both higher education and schools to develop transferable skills and competences. The collection focuses on some highly innovative practice and also provides information on how projects have been set up and organised so that they can be replicated. I really enjoyed being on the editorial team.

All chapters are fully downloadable at the above link.

London Language Show presentation now online

I recently presented at the London Language Show on behalf of Routes into Languages with Irena Holdsworth from Routes South West and Sarah Schechter from Routes East. Our presentation: What Routes into Languages can do for you and your school focused on exciting projects that help to take languages out of the classroom and is now online.


Employability for Languages Handbook

I’m very excited to be working on a new initiative with two of my University of Southampton colleagues, Erika Corradini and Kate Borthwick. As part of an employability project that we are conducting for Routes into Languages, we are editing an Employability for Languages handbook. We’ve invited contributions and will be showcasing inspiring case studies in the area of employability for languages graduates. The result will be an open access e-book which will be freely available for download. We’re very much looking forward to receiving expressions of interest and I’ll update on our progress later on.